Pat’s Film Club

making going to the cinema an event again

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Sunday February 18th

Revisit one of the seminal double features of the late 70s with Alan Parker’s Prison Break Drama MIDNIGHT EXPRESS and Robert DeNiro in Martin Scorsese’s classic TAXI DRIVER

 

This month, we delve into the harrowing depths of Alan Parker’s ‘Midnight Express‘, a film that remains a powerful testament to the human spirit in the face of despair. Based on the true story of Billy Hayes, a young American caught smuggling drugs out of Turkey, the film navigates the brutal reality of his imprisonment and the subsequent fight for freedom.

With an Oscar-winning screenplay by Oliver Stone, ‘Midnight Express’ offers an unflinching look at the harsh conditions within the Turkish penal system, underscored by Giorgio Moroder’s hauntingly electronic score, which won an Academy Award for Best Original Score.

The film’s raw portrayal of injustice and resilience presents a stark reminder of the thin line between hope and despair.

Following our descent into the darkness of human captivity, and a much-needed break, we travel to the neon-lit streets of New York with Martin Scorsese’s seminal work, ‘Taxi Driver’.

This visceral exploration of urban isolation and the fine line between salvation and destruction follows Travis Bickle, a Vietnam War veteran turned taxi driver, portrayed in a career-defining performance by Robert De Niro.

The film masterfully captures the underbelly of 1970s New York, a city rife with vice and violence, through the eyes of its increasingly detached protagonist. ‘Taxi Driver’ remains a cornerstone of American cinema, not only for its gritty realism and psychological depth but also for its influence on the portrayal of antiheroes in film.

Bernard Herrmann’s haunting score, his final composition, adds layers of tension and foreboding, making this film an unforgettable experience on the big screen.

Join us this month at Plaza Cinema as we revisit these groundbreaking films from the 1970s.

Each screening offers a unique opportunity to experience classics as they were meant to be seen: in the company of fellow cinephiles, on the big screen.

These films not only capture the essence of an era but also serve as a reminder of the enduring power of cinema to confront, challenge, and captivate. Don’t miss this opportunity to immerse yourself in the raw, unfiltered emotions and timeless narratives that these masterpieces present.

Mark Kermode on Taxi driver